Texas Sex Offenders

Texas’ sex offender law took effect in 1991. The law requires convicted sex offenders in Texas to register with a local law enforcement authority in the state. Failure to comply may lead to felony prosecution.

Aside from registration, sex offenders in Texas must report from time to time to verify their registered information. Sex offenders in the state must report any changes to their registered information to the local authorities within 48 hours.

Texas sex offender law protects the residents of the state from sex crime recidivism. The law makes sure residents get a notification whenever a sex offender moves into their neighborhood.

Texas Sex Offender Registry

Texas Department of Public Safety is in charge of the state’s sex offender registry. The department collects information on offenders from local law enforcement agents in the state.

TXDPS stores this information in a database that is accessible to the public. You can access this data through the Texas Public Sex Offender Registry available on TXDPS website.

In Texas, all local law enforcement agencies manage their sex offender registry. This registry contains information of sex offenders registered with the agency. This information is available to the public. Most local law enforcement agencies run their websitewhich is accessible to the public. Residents can also get notifications on offenders from other outlets like the newspapers.

Texas Sex Offender Facts

Facts

  • There are 58,072 registered sex offenders in Texas

Top Offenses

  • INDECENCY WITH A CHILD SEXUAL CONTACT
  • AGGRAVATED SEXUAL ASSAULT OF A CHILD
  • SEXUAL ASSAULT OF A CHILD
  • SEXUAL ASSAULT
  • AGGRAVATED SEXUAL ASSAULT

Counties in Texas with the highest number of offenders:

  • Harris County
  • Dallas County
  • Tarrant County
  • Bexar County
  • Travis County
Zip Codes in Texas with the highest number of offenders:
  • 75216
  • 77078
  • 75241
  • 77026
  • 79339
  • 78207
  • 75217
  • 75215
  • 77028
  • 79928
Nearby States:
Texas Sex Crimes Requiring Offender Registration
  • Indecency with a child - TEX. PENAL CODE ANN. § 21.11 (Vernon West 2008).

  • Sexual assault - TEX. PENAL CODE ANN. § 22.011 (Vernon West 2008).

  • Aggravated sexual assault - TEX. PENAL CODE ANN. § 22.021 (Vernon West 2008).

  • Prohibited sexual conduct - TEX. PENAL CODE ANN. § 25.02 (Vernon West 2008).

  • Compelling prostitution - TEX. PENAL CODE ANN. § 43.05 (Vernon West 2008).

  • Sexual performance by a child - TEX. PENAL CODE ANN. § 43.25 (Vernon West 2008).

  • Possession or promotion of child pornography - TEX. PENAL CODE ANN. § 43.26 (Vernon West 2008).

  • Aggravated kidnapping if the actor committed the offense or engaged in the conduct with the intent to violate or abuse the victim sexually - TEX. PENAL CODE ANN. § 20.04(a)(4) (Vernon West 2008).

  • Burglary, if the offense or conduct is punishable under subsection (d) and the actor committed the offense or engaged in the conduct with the intent to commit indecency with a child, sexual assault, aggravated sexual assault, prohibited sexual conduct, or aggravated kidnapping - TEX. PENAL CODE ANN. § 30.02 (Vernon West 2008).

  • Unlawful restraint, if the victim was under 17 years of age - TEX. PENAL CODE ANN. § 20.02 (Vernon

  • West 2008).

  • Kidnapping, if the victim was under 17 years of age - TEX. PENAL CODE ANN. § 20.03 (Vernon West

  • 2008).

  • Aggravated kidnapping, if the victim was under 17 years of age - TEX. PENAL CODE ANN. § 20.04 (Vernon West 2008).

  • A second violation for indecent exposure, unless the second violation results in a deferred adjudication -

  • TEX. PENAL CODE ANN. § 21.08 (Vernon West 2008).

  • Attempt, conspiracy or solicitation to commit an offense or engage in conduct listed above.

  • A violation of the laws of another state, federal law, the laws of a foreign country, or the Uniform Code of Military Justice for or based on the violation of an offense containing elements that are substantially similar to the elements of an offense listed above.

Information maintained in Texas Sex Offender Registry

TX. CRIM. PRO. ART. 62.051 (West 2008)

(c) The registration form shall require:

  1. The person's full name, each alias, date of birth, sex, race, height, weight, eye color, hair color, social security number, driver's license number, shoe size, and home address;

  2. A recent color photograph or, if possible, an electronic digital image of the person and a complete set of the person's fingerprints;

  3. The type of offense the person was convicted of, the age of the victim, the date of conviction, and the punishment received;

  4. An indication as to whether the person is discharged, paroled, or released on juvenile probation, community supervision, or mandatory supervision;

  5. An indication of each license, as defined by Article 62.005(g), that is held or sought by the person;

  6. An indication as to whether the person is or will be employed, carrying on a vocation, or a student at a particular public or private institution of higher education in this state or another state, and the name and address of that institution; and (7) any other information required by the department.

Community Notification and Websites

TX. CRIM. PRO. ART. 62.056 (West 2008)

(d) On receipt of notice under this chapter that a person subject to registration under this chapter is required to register or verify registration with a local law enforcement authority and has been assigned a numeric risk level of three, the local law enforcement authority may provide notice to the public in any manner determined appropriate by the local law enforcement authority, including:

  • Publishing notice in a newspaper or other periodical or

  • Circular in circulation in the area where the person intends to reside,

  • Holding a neighborhood meeting,

  • Posting notices in the area where the person intends to reside,

  • Distributing printed notices to area residents, or

  • Establishing a specialized local website.

The local law enforcement authority may include in the notice only information that is public information under this chapter.

Limitations on Residency or Employment

None

Duration of Registration

TX. CRIM. PRO. ART. 62.101 (West 2008)

(5)(b) 10 years for offenders not subject to lifetime registration.

Life for persons with a reportable conviction for:

  • A sexually violent offense;

  • Prohibited sexual conduct;

  • Compelling prostitution;

  • Possession or promotion of child pornography;

  • Indecency with a child, if the person has prior or subsequent convictions for a registrable offense;

  • Unlawful restraint, kidnapping or aggravated kidnapping of a victim under 17 and the offender has prior or subsequent convictions for a registrable offense;

  • Child pornography is depicting a minor.

Timeframe for Registration

Within 7 days of arriving at the intended residence or 7 days of changing address (for reportable convictions between 9/1/91-8/31/95); 7 days before the intended move (for reportable convictions after 9/1/95)

Applies to Offenders Convicted in another State?

Yes, if the reportable conviction is after 9/1/95 and offender is on supervision; yes, if the offender is not on Supervision and conviction state has mandatory post discharge registration requirement

Verification of Address

Yes, for reportable convictions after 9/1/95

Penalties for Non-Compliance

First failure to comply Class A misdemeanor; second failure third-degree felony; a revocable offense for reportable convictions after 9/1/9

What does a Sex Offender Look Like?

Most people think sexual predators are scary-looking and creepy. But three out of four adolescents who were sexually assaulted were victimized by someone they knew well.

Most of the time, sexual predators look like regular people. Children and parents need to know and to understand that anyone can be a sexual predator, no matter how "normal" they appear.

Encouraging Children to Share

It isn't always easy to build a trusting relationship with your child. Trying to get your children to share what is going on in their lives can be difficult.

Building an open and welcoming environment from the beginning stages of a child's life is essential. Children are less intimidated and more likely to discuss issues and topics in their lives with an open and supportive environment.

Getting your kids to share serves as a building block for times when your child needs to discuss pressing issues like sex and sexual abuse.

Free Parental eBook

KidsLiveSafe put together a comprehensive parents guide about sexual predators and keeping children safe. This free online eBook includes vital statistics, how to tell if a predator is victimizing a child, and social media and cyber-bullying.

See KidsLiveSafe eBook